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On Tuesday, July 14, 2020, Mainers will cast votes in primary races for U.S. Senate, U.S. House for CD2, and for Maine Legislature. Votes can be cast by absentee ballot or on election day. Due to the covid-19 pandemic, some polling places may change. For polling location updates, call your local election office.  

July 14 Ballot

U.S. Senate

Democratic primary candidates for U.S. Senate (in alphabetical order):

U.S. House

Republican primary candidates for U.S. House for the second congressional district (in alphabetical order):

Maine Legislature

In the Maine Senate, there are 6 Democratic primary races and 3 Republican primaries. Read the full list. 

In the Maine House, there are 20 Democratic primary races and 7 Republican primaries. Read the full list. 

County offices

There are a number of primaries for county-level offices around the state, including county commissioner (CC), probate judge (JP), register of probate (RP), and sheriff (SH). Learn more about what these officials do from the Maine County Commissioners Association. Download the list of primary candidates from the Secretary of State. Find the county positions using the abbreviations above.

Question 1: Broadband Bond

Question 1: Do you favor a $15 million bond issue to invest in high-speed internet infrastructure for unserved and underserved areas, to be used to match up to $30 million in federal, private, local or other funds? (Read more)

  • A “yes” vote supports this measure to authorize $15 million in general obligation bonds for the ConnectME Authority to provide funding for high-speed internet infrastructure in unserved and underserved areas.
  • A “no” vote opposes this measure to authorize $15 million in general obligation bonds for the ConnectME Authority to provide funding for high-speed internet infrastructure in unserved and underserved areas.

Question 2: Transportation Bond

Question 2: Do you favor a $105 million bond issue for improvement of highways and bridges statewide and for multimodal facilities or equipment related to transit, freight and passenger railroads, aviation, ports, harbors, marine transportation and active transportation projects, to be used to match an estimated $275 million in federal and other funds? (Read more)

  • A “yes” vote supports this measure to authorize $105 million in general obligation bonds for transportation infrastructure projects.
  • A “no” vote opposes this measure to authorize $105 million in general obligation bonds for transportation infrastructure projects.

LEGISLATIVE SCORECARDS

VOTER RESOURCES

TAKE ACTION

 

Request your absentee ballot. You can request an absentee ballot now for the July 14 primary for yourself or a family member online, by calling your municipal clerk, or by completing this downloadable PDF and returning it by mail. Primary ballots will be mailed in mid-June. Although absentee ballots can be completed at your town office (Maine’s version of in-person early voting), voters are encouraged to return them by mail to reduce the spread of covid-19 and protect their fellow Mainers. Absentee ballots must be received at your polling place by 8 pm on July 14. Pay close attention to instructions and postage requirements and be sure to sign the back of the ballot in the appropriate area! Your ballot will not be counted if it is not signed! Learn more about Maine’s absentee ballot process on the League of Women Voters of Maine website.

 

Register to vote. Did you know you can register to vote by mail? Just download a voter registration form as a PDF or a Word doc (accessible to screen readers) and return it and all required documentation by mail to your municipal clerk or to Secretary of State’s office: Division of Elections: #101 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333-0101. Request an absentee ballot at the same time by including an absentee ballot request form with your voter registration form. Although you may register to vote in person at your town office at any time, including on Election Day, mailed voter registration forms must be received by July 7 in order to vote on July 14. Get more information about registering to vote in our FAQ or from the Maine Secretary of State.

 

Tell officials to mail absentee ballots to all voters. Constituent-led volunteer groups like Suit Up Maine are working to advance a number of recommendations drafted by a dozen advocacy organizations to make voting safer during the covid-19 pandemic. (Read the recommendations here.) Among the most important is a push to mail absentee ballots with postage-paid return envelopes to every registered voter in Maine. The coalition recently presented Gov. Janet Mills with a petition signed by 2,300 Mainers in support of the the absentee ballot initiative and a request that safe in-person voting options be preserved. Call and write your state legislators, Gov. Mills, and Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap and urge them to take action now.

 

Complete your 2020 Census. How is the Census related to elections? Census results are used to determine congressional representation and Maine’s legislative districts, as well as the amount of federal funding states receive for education, transportation, hospitals, fire departments, and vital programs such as Medicaid, Medicare, school lunches, and SNAP. Learn more about the Census in our call to action and complete yours online, by phone, or by mail. 

 

Tell senators to pass election funding. In March, Congress added $400 million to a stimulus package to help states prepare for elections during the COVID-19 pandemic. The amount is far short of what elections officials say is needed to expand absentee voting or voting by mail and other measures to ensure the safety of voters and poll workers in November. In May, the House passed a stimulus package that includes $3.6 billion to bolster election security, as well as funds to support the U.S. Postal Service. The Senate has not taken up the bill. Contact Sen. Collins by email or call (202)224-2523. Contact Sen. King by email or call (202) 224-5344. Or, send them a letter via a League of Women Voters form

VOLUNTEER

 

The most important thing you can do this year is vote. The second most important thing you can do is help get out the vote and make sure everyone who can vote is able to do so safely and easily. Here is where your help is most needed for the July 14 primary:

  • Be a poll worker July 14. Many Maine towns are facing a shortage of poll workers during the covid-19 pandemic, which could lead to fewer poll locations and longer lines on Election Day for people who are unable to vote by mail via absentee ballot. If you are not at high risk and are able, please sign up to work the polls on Election Day. Poll workers must be registered to vote in Maine, be 18 by the general election, and live in the county in which they will be working. Payment is set by each town. To sign up, contact your town office or sing up via the Voter Protection Project from the Maine Democratic Party (MDP).
  • Call Maine voters.  Direct contact with voters is the best way to increase voter participation. For the July 14 primary, organizations are doing that via phone banking. Several organizations we work are holding regular phone banks. Here’s how to sign up:
  • Maine Voter Protection Team. The MDP Voter Protection Team is looking for volunteers to staff their voter protection hotline between now and November and to serve as poll observers on Election Day. Sign up here.
  • Volunteer with state candidates.* Keeping, and possibly increasing, progressive majorities in the Maine House and Senate in every election is key to passing critical legislation on everything from health care to voting rights. But this year, there’s even more on the line. The next Maine Legislature will draw legislative districts for the coming decade, a process completed every 10 years using the most recent Census data. Progressives are locked in tight races around the state and need your help. To volunteer for a Maine Senate race, sign up here. To join a Maine House campaign, sign up here

*Volunteer sign-up links for federal races will be posted after the July 14 primary.

How do I...

Register to vote?

You may register to vote in Maine if you are:

  • a U.S. citizen
  • will be at least 18 years old by election day
  • and have established a fixed principal home in Maine.

To register, complete a voter registration card and return it in person at your town office or by mail (if by mail, it must be received by June 19 for the July 14 primary). You will need to provide a driver’s license, state ID, or the last 4 digits of your social security number, as well as proof of residency, such as a utility bill or lease. Find everything you need to register on the Maine Secretary of State’s website.

Check my voter registration?

To verify your voter registration information, call your local municipal election official.

Register online?

Maine does not have online voter registration.

Register by mail?

You can download a voter registration form as a PDF or a Word doc (accessible to screen readers) from the Maine Secretary of State and return it and all required documentation by mail to your municipal clerk or to the Secretary of State’s office: Division of Elections: #101 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333-0101. Request an absentee ballot at the same time by including an absentee ballot request form with your voter registration form.

Although you may register to vote in person at your town office at any time, including on Election Day, mailed registration forms must be received by June 19. Get more information about registering to vote in our FAQ or from the Maine Secretary of State.

Register if I am a college student?

Provided you meet the state’s residency requirements (which include dorms), Maine law allows students attending college in Maine to register and vote in the town where you attend college, even if you pay “out of state” tuition. Learn more from the Maine Voting Residence Fact Sheet.

If you are a resident of Maine attending college in another state, you may vote by absentee ballot.

Register on election day?

Maine has same-day registration, which means you can register to vote at your polling place on election day. You will need to bring ID and proof of residency in the town in which you are voting. Find more information on the Maine Secretary of State website.

Request an absentee ballot?

Any registered voter can vote by absentee ballot in Maine. To vote by absentee ballot in the July 14 primary, you can request an absentee ballot as late as Election Day. However, absentee ballots must be received at your polling place by 8 pm ET on the day of the election. Pay close attention to instructions and postage requirements and be sure to sign the back of the ballot in the appropriate area! Your ballot will not be counted if it is not signed! You can request an absentee ballot now for the July 14 primary for yourself or a family member online, by calling your municipal clerk, or by completing this downloadable PDF and returning it by mail. 

Vote early?

Completing an absentee ballot in person at your town office before the election is Maine’s version of in-person early voting. Although in-person early absentee ballot voting will be allowed for the July 14 primary, voters are encouraged to return absentee ballots by mail to reduce the spread of covid-19 and protect their fellow Mainers. Anyone can vote by absentee ballot, with no excuse needed. Requests for absentee ballots can be requested as late as July 14, but must be received at your polling place by 8 pm on election day. Find more information on the Maine Secretary of State website.

Vote with Ranked Choice Voting?

Sometimes called “instant run-off voting,” ranked-choice voting (RCV) ensures that only candidates who win at least 50.1% of the vote are elected to office. RCV will ONLY be used in the U.S. Senate and House races. Voters will have ranked choice voting for the July 14 state and federal primaries. In November, RCV will be used for federal races but not state races . Learn more about how RCV works on the Maine Secretary of State website or from the Committee for Ranked Choice Voting.

Find my polling place?

Find your polling place, list of candidates you will vote on, and a list of your current elected officials in the Maine Voter Information Lookup Service. Note that because of covid-19, some poll locations may be closed due to a lack of poll workers. To verify your location, the safest bet is to call your Municipal Clerk

Vote if I am living or stationed outside the U.S.?

Maine residents who are uniformed service members or who are currently living outside the U.S. may be allowed to vote in Maine’s elections if you meet certain criteria. Visit the Maine Secretary of State’s website for more information.

Vote if I have a felony conviction?

Maine does not disenfranchise voters due to felony convictions. Provided you meet the state’s voter registration requirements, you may register and vote in Maine even if you are currently serving out your sentence.

Register voters?

If your group or organization would like to register voters, a representative must complete a Voter Registration Card Request Form. Read the state’s Voter Registration Card Distribution Policy. Contact the Secretary of State’s office for more information at 207-624-7736.

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